aztec calendar

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Aztec and Maya Calendar

Did you know?

The Aztec, Maya and most other mesoamerican people used the same 260-day calendar with an identical correlation. So the Aztec date 1-Cipactli corresponds to 1-Imix for the Maya, etcetera.

Month: Day: Year:   

In the tonalpohualli, the sacred Aztec calendar, this day (Sunday, January 12, 2014) is:


Tonalli:

day

Trecena:

13-day period

Xihuitl:

solar year
Mazatl (deer)Mazatl (deer)Tochtli (rabbit)
1 - Mazatl (deer)1 - Mazatl (deer)2 - Tochtli (rabbit)
 

Yoaltecuhtli:

Lord of the Night

Xiuhpohualli:

365-day calendar

Long Count:

(Mayan calendar)
Tlaloc19 - Hueitozoztli (IV)13.0.1.1.7

(Correlation: Alfonso Caso - Nicholson's veintena alignment [adjust] )

The significance of this day

Day Mazatl (Deer) is governed by Tlaloc, God of Rain and Thunderstorms, as its provider of tonalli (Shadow Soul) life energy. Mazatl is the day of the hunt. It is a good day to stalk your quarry, a bad day to be stalked. Mazatl is a day for breaking old routines and to pay close attention to the routines of others. This is a day for doubling-back on your tracks.

Day 1 - Mazatl is influenced by the Cihuateteo.

The thirteen day period (trecena) that starts with day 1-Mazatl (Deer) is ruled by Tepeyollotl, the Heart of the Mountain, the Jaguar of Night, lord of the animals and darkened caves. Tepeyollotl is Tezcatlipoca disguised in a jaguar hide, whose voice is the echo in the wilderness and whose word is the darkness itself, calls to the heart in the voice of the conch. These are 13 days associated with the hunt: whether one is the hunter or the game, this trecena reminds us that our lives are determined by the act of stalking. The arts of tracking and back-tracking, of spotting and camouflaging, of following tracks and covering tracks, rule our lives to the degree that we master them. These are good days to study the routines of others; bad days to keep to your routines.



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