aztec calendar

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Aztec and Maya Calendar

Did you know?

In the years after the conquest of Mexico, the xiuhpohualli (solar calendar) became tied to the Julian calendar as used by the Spaniards. This effectively introduced a leap year to the Aztec calendar every four years (this site provides the pre-conquest calendar).

Month: Day: Year:   

In the tonalpohualli, the sacred Aztec calendar, this day (Thursday, August 28, 2014) is:


Tonalli:

day

Trecena:

13-day period

Xihuitl:

solar year
Cuauhtli (eagle)Tochtli (rabbit)Tochtli (rabbit)
8 - Cuauhtli (eagle)1 - Tochtli (rabbit)2 - Tochtli (rabbit)
 

Yoaltecuhtli:

Lord of the Night

Xiuhpohualli:

365-day calendar

Long Count:

(Mayan calendar)
Piltzintecuhtli7 - Atemoztli (XVI)13.0.1.12.15

(Correlation: Alfonso Caso - Nicholson's veintena alignment [adjust] )

The significance of this day

Day Cuauhtli (Eagle) is governed by Xipe Totec, God of Seedtime, as its provider of tonalli (Shadow Soul) life energy. Cuauhtli is a day of fighting for freedom and equality. It is a day of the Warriors of Huitzilopochtli, those who sacrifice their lives willingly to keep the present age, the Fifth Sol, moving. It is a good day for action, a bad day for reflection. A good day for invoking the gods, a bad day for ignoring them.

The thirteen day period (trecena) that starts with day 1-Tochtli (Rabbit) is ruled by Xiuhtecuhtli, Lord of the Year. Tochtli is the last trecena of the sacred year. It signifies the end of one cycle and the beginning of a new one. These are 13 days associated with the mystical sacrifice proper to the vanguard of another age: it is an auspicious time, one great workers united in their goals; it is also a dangerous time, one of great risks requiring great courage and diligence. These days remind us of the old god, the first god, who both separates and unites the worlds of dreaming and waking: somewhere between winter and spring, something wakes in the dreaming heart which endures across the span of the cycling ages. These are good days to focus on the needs of others; bad days to focus on one's own needs.



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